Skip to main content
Snorkeling at Hanauma Bay
Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve

Add To My Travel Log

Organize your favorite pages for an upcoming trip in one place.

Go Snorkeling at Hanauma Bay

Hanauma Bay is a former volcanic crater ten miles east of Waikiki. The bay gets its name from the Hawaiian “hana” for bay and “uma” for curve, so the name literally translated means “curved bay.”
 
Hanauma Bay is everything you could want in a Hawaiian beach, with scenery that’s been featured in several movies, including Elvis’ Blue Hawaii and John Wayne’s Donovan’s Reef. The real draw to Hanauma Bay, however, lies beneath the waves. The bay is one of the most popular snorkeling destinations in Hawaii.

 

Add To My Travel Log

Organize your favorite pages for an upcoming trip in one place.

snorkeling-circles-circle-2-snorkeling-intermediate-360x360.jpg

The Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve

Hanauma Bay was decreed a protected marine life conservation center in 1967. Today, the bay is home to over four hundred species of fish, including the reef triggerfish or Humuhumunukunukuapua'a—the little fish with a big name that’s the state fish.
 
In addition to the many fish that call the bay home, snorkelers can spot sea urchins, octopus, moray eels, and a wide range of invertebrates, many of which are found only in Hawaiian waters. If you’re lucky, you may see eagle rays or a small reef shark.


 
kayaking-island-images-maui-sea-turtle-355x440.jpgGreen Sea Turtles
For most snorkelers, the highlight of a trip to Hanauma Bay are the green sea turtles, or honu. Turtles are often seen in the shallow waters of the reef, where they eat limu, or seaweed.
 
Honu are a protected species, and it’s illegal to touch or otherwise harass one. If you get to close honu may yawn at you or, if they’re particularly stressed, swipe a front flipper over their forehead. This is turtle talk for “leave me alone.” If you see a honu make either of these motions, give it a little more space.

 


snorkeling at Hanauma Bay

Add To My Travel Log

Organize your favorite pages for an upcoming trip in one place.

Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve Admission

Hanauma Bay is open every day except Tuesdays, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. In the summer, the park opens at 6.00 a.m. and closes at 7:00 p.m. In the winter, the park closes at 6:00 p.m.

Admission to the park is $7.50 per adult. Children twelve and under get in free, as do active military personnel and Hawaii residents with identification. First-time visitors are required to watch a short nine-minute video about marine life, conservation, and snorkeling safety. Once the video’s over you get to the beach along a steep ten-minute path. If you don’t fancy the walk, take the tram for $1.00 down and $1.25 back.

Parking is $1.00 a vehicle, but with only 300 spots, the parking lot fills up quickly. The Oahu bus service stops by the bay, or you can take a taxi or use an on-demand driving service like Lyft or Uber.

More details on pricing


Add To My Travel Log

Organize your favorite pages for an upcoming trip in one place.

Hanauma Bay Amenities

At the beach you’ll find lifeguards, changing rooms, restrooms, showers, and food concessions. If you don’t have your own snorkel set, you can rent on for about $20.00.


view more activitiesview our hotels on oahu

Make a Reservation

      One or more of your selected nights are unavailable.
      The room is not available for your dates.
      Please change your dates.
      Please change your dates or select another room type.
       
      Selected Dates
       
      Rooms Available
       
      No Availability
       
      Minimum Stay